Hard to beat my job when this is this is my weekend office: football practice held underneath the Space Needle, on a sublime Seattle afternoon in April.   Hard to beat my job when this is this is my weekend office: football practice held underneath the Space Needle, on a sublime Seattle afternoon in April.   Hard to beat my job when this is this is my weekend office: football practice held underneath the Space Needle, on a sublime Seattle afternoon in April.   Hard to beat my job when this is this is my weekend office: football practice held underneath the Space Needle, on a sublime Seattle afternoon in April.   Hard to beat my job when this is this is my weekend office: football practice held underneath the Space Needle, on a sublime Seattle afternoon in April.  

Hard to beat my job when this is this is my weekend office: football practice held underneath the Space Needle, on a sublime Seattle afternoon in April.  

Conibear Shellhouse at night, following the Husky men’s crew National Championship celebration.

Pregame. Memorial Stadium. Lincoln, Neb. (Taken with instagram)

Not a bad view for Huskies vs. Nebraska. (Taken with instagram)

We first started working with ESPN’s Ivan Maisel on this story a few months ago (conducted a few of the interviews at one of our favorite pizzerias in Varlamos).

It’s an intriguing topic: How do large public universities thrive in major-metro markets? There is so much competition for the entertainment dollar that schools like Washington have to be at the very best at what they do, not just on the field but in terms of marketing, communication, branding, etc.

This story goes a little deeper in what an athletic department has to do to thrive given the circumstances. As my boss puts it in the story, we’re “Northwest Sensible.” There are things that work in other major-metro areas that don’t fit the culture in Seattle. The key is being as creative as possible while staying true to the institution’s traditions.

Pure engine room speed, brought to you by the fine oarsmen of Washington rowing. Built in Seattle, refined in Princeton, tested on the Cooper River.

Washington men’s crew team doing work on Lake Carnegie in Princeton, N.J.

I rowed in college, and loved it. We were an okay crew. Won some races, lost some races, but I’m thankful for the experience. Back then, I used to look at Washington rowing with such respect. When I was competing at IRAs and saw the UW crews there, I made a point to watch the manner they carried themselves and how they raced.

And now I get to work with them. Have I mentioned I love my job…

We handed out nearly 100 credentials for Pro Day this week at Washington. One thing we never get tired of at UW is promoting the excellence of our student-athletes, starting with this dude right here.